Friday Essay – What or who would you be if you knew you couldn’t fail?

Emily Carr statueToday’s meaning-making question comes from theunboundedspirit.com

I’m going to start from the premise that I must begin at this point in my life.  Because there are a few points in my past where this question may have spurred me in a different direction.  In any event, starting from this point in my life if I knew I could not fail I’d probably quite my job, move out to the Coast and do all the things I’m thinking about doing.  I’m at a point in my life that I’ve heard described at the ‘F**k You Forties’.  I don’t have any little people at home to care for.  My parents are basically in good health and don’t require extra care.  I have played by the rules.  I have two degrees, I own a home, I have a pension plan and my debt to asset ratio is quiet good. My health could do with some work but nothing more exercise can’t fix.  I don’t owe anyone anything any more.  I’ve come to a point where with good planning and few more investments (mostly of time and learning) I can lead the life I want to lead.  I’m actually not afraid of failing.  That fear held me back on a few occasions.  As a young woman and then as a single mother I made some pretty safe choices.  It seems that when young failure is very scary and seems relatively permanent. But after living forty-odd years, making many huge mistakes and having to deal with some pretty serious issues, I’ve come to the realization that failure is not the worst thing that can happen to me.  It’s unlikely that I’ll actually be successful at everything I try.  So, why not try as many things as I want to?  I know I sound like quotes from dead presidents and motivation posters but, … it’s being afraid to do things, to follow my bliss that would be the true failure.  I have no intention of coming to end of my life and thinking, “Crap, I played it too safe!”  I may not bungee jump off a cliff into a gorge but I’m also not going to spend the next twenty years in a fluorescent-lighted cubicle waiting for my pension to mature.  I’m going to live my life and, actually, I expect I’ll fail at a few things along the way.

What would you do if you knew you couldn’t fail?  What will you do even if you might fail?

Be Lovely to Each Other,
Laura

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